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AI may have Populated Entire Galaxies, Turning Every Solar System Into a Computer

A new theory proposed by a Theoretical physicist at the National Research University of Electronic Technology (MIET) in Russia tries to explain why humans have not detected traces of extraterrestrial life. The study proposes that the advanced life forms that colonize sat can destroy many of the species along the way. Also, alien killer robots may have fill the supercluster with copies of itself, turning each solar system into a supercomputer, and destroying life along the way.

However, the destructive power of humanity could kill all alien civilizations.

The universe is SO big, it’s hard to put it in perspective.

According to astronomers, there are 100 to 400 billion stars in the Milky Way and over 100 billion galaxies in the Universe – some say it can’t be as much as 500 billion, which means that there are around 50,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (5 × 1022) habitable planets. That is, of course, if there is ONE universe.

If you multiply the stars in the galaxies, at the low end, you get 10 million dollars, a billion stars, or 10 sextillion stars in the Universe – one one followed by 22 zeros.

At the top end, it is 200 sextillions.

Right within our Galaxy, the Milky Way experts believe they are around 400 billion MILLION STARS, but this number may seem small, as some astrophysicists believe that stars in our galaxy could figure in BILLIONS of dollars.

This means that the Milky Way could only be home to over 100 BILLION planets. So where the hell is everyone?

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This question leads us to the call Fermi Paradox, a scientific mystery that wonders why we have not come across extraterrestrial life if there are billions of stars in our galaxy and many more outside it.

Generations of scientists have grown weary of answering this mystery since the paradox was formulated.

Some believe that aliens may be hibernating, some have argued that something mysterious is preventing them from evolving, while others suggest that humans are too insignificant for aliens to come into contact.

However, a theoretical physicist from the National Research University of Electronic Technology (MIET) in Russia has come up with another explanation of why we haven’t come through our cosmic neighbors, and he calls it the “First to enter, last to leave” the solution to the Fermi Paradox.

Professor Alejandro Berezin of the study, which has yet to be peer-reviewed, explains how the paradox has a “trivial solution that does not require the controversial hypothesis”, but it can be “difficult to accept, since it foresees a future for our own civilization, which is even worse than that of extinction. ”

Professor Berezin explains that during all this time, we have been defining extraterrestrial life too narrowly. And you may be right.

“The specific nature of civilizations emerging at the interstellar level does not matter,” he writes.

“It can have biological organisms like us, rogue AIs who rebelled against their creators, or distributed planet-scale minds such as those described by Stanislaw Lem in Solaris. “

But even with a wide scope, there is still no sign of anyone. (officially)

But, Berezin explains that the only parameter that the physicist must be concerned with is the threshold at which we can observe its existence.

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In the article published on arXiv, Berezin explains that: “The only variable that can be objectively measured is the probability that life becomes detectable from outer space within a certain range on Earth,” Berezin explains.

“For simplicity, let’s call it ‘parameter’.”

Berezin’s role really puts things right and helps us understand alien life and why we haven’t come across it.

If alien civilizations fail to come up with one parameter, be it through the development of interstellar travel, managing the emission of communication through space, or by any other means, they may still exist, but it will not help us to solve the paradox.

The “First in, First Out” solution proposed by Berezin is a bleak scenario.

“What if the first life form to arrive at an interstellar capacity trip necessarily destroys all of the competition to fuel its own expansion?” he hypothesis.

However, this does not necessarily mean that a highly advanced alien civilization technology consciously cleanses other life forms, but simply does not even count that they are there.

“They just won’t notice, the same way a construction crew knocks down an anthill for building real estate because they have no incentive to protect,” Berezin writes.

But Berezin does not suggest that they are ants. It may be the future destroyer of the worlds we are seeking. Take Mars as an example.

“Assuming the above theory is accurate, what does it mean for our future?” Berezin writes.

“The only solution is to invoke the anthropic principle. We are the first to reach the [interestelar] stage. And, most likely, it will be the last to come out.”

On paper, Berezin also mentions the dangers of AI, untethered by the limitations of its accumulation of power.

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“A rogue AI can possibly fill the supercluster with copies of itself, turning every solar system into a supercomputer, and there is no use asking why it would do that,” Berezin writes.

“All that matters is that you can.”

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